Case Studies

CASE STUDY: Travis Tiddy

In 2009, Travis Tiddy helped organise a survey for the West Coast community of Tasmania, where he was raised. The results suggested that people wanted a vehicle for their pride, a festival to boost the economy and bring people together.

The entrance to Crib Lane, the festival's industrial food, entertainment and music hub. Photograph by Shane Viper.
The entrance to Crib Lane, the festival's industrial food, entertainment and music hub. Photograph by Shane Viper.

Rather than pretend the West Coast is something it’s not, Travis and other members of what was originally called Project Queenstown decided to “explore qualities of the West Coast not commonly viewed as marketable – isolation, bad weather, mining and pollution – and subvert them into unique, raw-but-real attributes.”

It wasn’t the comfortable route - Travis had no models to follow. “The West Coast is infamously unorthodox and rejects common ways of doing things,” he says, “so we’ve had to work with grit and determination to create new cultural experiences and narratives for our region.”

And so The Unconformity was born, a cultural festival held every two years that lives up to its name. It’s distinct and unforgettable in a loud, bland world of digital entertainment.

“Walk this hard, uncompromising landscape and meet our people. Become disoriented, be provoked, and feel your perceptions being challenged. And find something of yourself in a place that exists on the edge, in wild western Tassie.”

Top left image credit: Dancers from Tasdance perform within Queenstown's mining-impacted Queen River, photograph by Jack Robert-Tissot

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