HYDRO PIPES TARRALEAH
 
EARLY PIONEERS OF THE WILD WEST COAST

WHY A STORY?

While it’s not wrong to describe Tasmania as “clean and green”, it’s a motto we share with countries and city councils and businesses all over the world. To find what is truly unique about Tasmania means adding a missing element: us. The Tasmanian people and our values, explaining what makes us different, and articulating what we want to achieve together.

That’s why we unearthed our story – the Tasmanian story.

WHAT DO WE MEAN BY THE TASMANIAN STORY?

When we are eight years old, we have a sophisticated understanding of narrative. Then over time, in school and at work, many of us bury this knowledge. Yet some people hold onto it. They’re natural storytellers. And they have a special advantage.

Stories inspire us to feel, and that matters because most of the decisions we make in life are emotional – regardless of what we try to tell ourselves. We remember stories. They are specific to people and to places, and they create meaning.

Over two years, we listened to hundreds of Tasmanians in hour-long, one-on-one interviews. Some of them had just arrived. Others told us about connections to this place lasting six generations or sixty thousand years. We wanted to understand why they had chosen Tasmania, what would break their hearts if they had to leave, the source of their pride, their regret, what we had done right together and what we had done wrong. We wanted to understand who we were, at our best, and how we might express it together.

Their stories followed a unifying pattern – a pattern of Tasmanian success.

FINDING THE STORY

When we listened to Tasmanians, the stories they told us followed a “rags-to-riches” structure, though we swap out the word riches with meaning. Success in Tasmania is about realising our individual – but shared – potential. Tasmanians are Cinderellas: hidden, misunderstood, beautiful but overlooked. Then, with hard work and hope, passion and obsession, they pursue the extraordinary. The difficulty makes the achievement... different. More human.

And it’ a source of emotion and pride as we tell the story in everything we do.

David Gardiner
“We have evolved as a State over the last decade in terms of shaking the ‘cultural cringe’.”
David Gardiner
John Haight
“Academics, tradies: people from different backgrounds can exchange ideas and get things done. I’ve seen it happen. The environment here is very conducive to that.”
John Haight
Judy Brown
“We’ve had a passion for doing the best we can do, it’s not new, but we want to be the best we can be. It’s given us a little bit of meaning. I’d like to think that’s a Tasmanian trait.”
Judy Brown
Joe Weller
“I want to make a living by making great music. The more I practice, the more I love it. I’d love for Tasmania to be the place people come to if they want a career doing something creative.”
Joe Weller
Christine Stevenson
“Anyone that starts a small business has got to be brave – to put yourself on the line. Even David Walsh, really! I admire anyone that works for themselves, has a go, does it on their own.”
Christine Stevenson
Jennifer Cole
“I’m more interested in the little person who has a go. Then to those knockers who say they can’t do it: ‘You see, I told you I could!’ That’s Tasmanian”
Jennifer Cole